Tuesday, August 25, 2009

The Lost Rewatch - Season 2 Review

We have completed Season 2 in the LOST Rewatch. The main focus of Season 2 is the Hatch, or the Swan, that was discovered in Season 1. The tail section survivors of Oceanic Flight 815 make a prominent appearance in Season 2. Ana Lucia, Libby, and Eko are amongst the Tailies that become main characters for this season. This is truly a phenomenal season of LOST that is full of shocking plot twists, character development, new mythology, intriguing flashbacks, religious themes, and literary techniques. There is so much to talk about, and so much to think about when it comes to this season. More information is revealed about the Monster, the Others, and the DHARMA Initiative. This season starts off with the best premiere and opener in LOST history, revealing the true nature of the Hatch in the opening scene. The extraordinary finale of Season 2 is full of more intertesting flashbacks, shocking reveals, and ominous mythology. I will be going through all 24 episodes of Season 2 - analyzing, reviewing, recapping, and rehashing the numerous motifs, themes, characters, cliffhangers, and plot twists that have accompanied this amazing season.

Episode 1 - "Man of Science, Man of Faith"

The premiere episode of Season 2 contains the best opener of all-time, and is the best episode of Season 2. This Jack-centric episode is a fabulous way to start LOST's fantastic second season. In the opener, we see an unknown man (Desmond David Hume) enter numbers into a computer. Then, in a shocking reveal, we discover that this is "The Hatch." Season 2 is a season that is full of many themes, motifs, symbolism, and mythology - this episode presents us with a lot of the central mythology to Lost, including the DHARMA Initiative. This episode shows us more of the similarities and differences between Jack Shephard (man of science) and John Locke (man of faith). The science vs. faith theme reaches the pinnacle in "Exodus," and is explored in further detail in this episode. Flashbacks show us that Jack is not a believer in miracles, but his strictly scientific viewpoint comes to a halt when his patient, Sarah, recovers from a near-fatal spinal injury. Relating this episode to Season 5, we see Jack undergo some major change in character from Seasons 3-5. Jack is a firm and adament believer in science, doesn't believe in the supernatual. Once Locke dies in "The Life and Death of Jeremy Bentham," we see Jack make a major leap of faith (seen prominently in "316"). Christian Shephard delivers one of my all-time favorite quotes in LOST history, telling Jack that "false hope" is still hope. This episode is a masterpiece, and will forever remain one of my favorite LOST episodes ever.


CHRISTIAN: You might want to try handing out some hope every once in awhile. Even if there's a 99 percent probability that they're utterly, hopelessly screwed, folks are much more inclined to hear that 1 percent chance that things are going to be okay.
JACK: Her spine's crushed. I tell her that everything's going to be okay -- that's false hope, dad.
CHRISTIAN: Maybe. Maybe, but it's still hope.

Episode 2 - "Adrift"

The raft exploding and Walt being kidnapped at the conclusion of "Exodus" is one of the most shocking and pulse-pounding cliffhangers ever. In this episode, Sawyer and Michael stay adrift in the sea, while Jin is missing. Michael blames Sawyer for everything because he prompted him to shoot the flare. This episode really demonstrates the utterly annoying side of Michael; I don't think it was fair for him to blame Sawyer for Walt being kidnapped, and Michael takes his grievances to the extreme when he tells Sawyer to get off his raft. I'm glad to see that Michael makes amends by the end of this episode, and admits that Walt's kidnapping was his fault. This episode concludes with a very creepy cliffhanger: Sawyer and Michael meet Jin who's hands are bounds, and "The Others" emerge from the ridge.

SAWYER: They found us because they were looking for us, for Walt.
MICHAEL: Don't you ever say his name again, ever.
SAWYER: Oh, what are you gonna do, splash me?

Episode 3 - "Orientation"

This is one of the better episodes from season two. "Orientation" is a very mythological episode, and it gives us a lot of insight on DHARMA, Hanso, and the DeGroots. Much of the mythology that is revealed in this episode is the framework for the mythology that we see in later seasons. Seeing the Swan orientation film for the first time was mind-boggling and overwhelming, and much like Locke, I wanted to watch it again (and again, and again). Flashbacks show us more of Helen and John's relationship, and how Anthony Cooper continues to get in the way of them. This episode only skims the surface in DHARMA; we learn much more about DHARMA in later seasons, especially Season 5, when the survivors time leap to the 1970s when the Initiative was in its heyday.


LOCKE: If it's not real, then what are you doing here, Jack? Why did you come back? Why do you find it so hard to believe?
JACK: Why do you find it so easy?
LOCKE: It's never been easy!

Episode 4 - "Everybody Hates Hugo"

This episode is one of my least favorite Hurley-centrics, but it isn't a bad episode by any means. The flashbacks take place after "Numbers," when Hurley found out that he won the lottery. He quits his job at Mr. Cluck's because of his boss, Randy Nations (ironically, Hurley will later be Randy's boss, and actually own Mr. Cluck's). On the Island, Hurley is in charge of the food. He thinks that everyone will hate him because he will be forced to control the food distributions amongst the survivors. Charlie is angry at Hurley because he can't give him a jar of peanut butter (something that Claire has wanted since Season 1). One of the best scenes of this episode is Hurley's dream; there are two very interesting points in this dream: 1) Jin speaking English, stating that "everything is going to change" and 2) Seeing a clever easter egg of Walt on the side of milk carton, with the words "MISSING" above him.


CHARLIE: Yeah. Quite simply, John, there are a lot of secrets around here, and I'm tired of being at the bloody kid's table. I got Claire's baby back. I didn't go swanning off to the Black Rock on the bloody A-Team mission, but I would have if someone had asked me. I think I'm entitled to some sodding answers around here.

Episode 5 - "...And Found"

In this episode, Sun loses her wedding ring. She searches for it desperately, and in the process, destroys her garden in anger. Locke approaches her, saying that he used to get angry all the time. He claims that he isn't lost anymore, and says that the only way something lost can be found is if you stop looking for it. Across the Island, Michael goes off looking for Walt (which becomes a common occurence this season). Eko and Jin go looking for him, and leave Ana Lucia, Sawyer, Bernard, Libby, and Cindy. One of the most classic scenes of LOST is in this episode: when Jin and Eko are in the jungle, they see a group of Others pass by. This scene raises a few questions: what was that group of Others doing in the jungle, and where were they going? In flashbacks, Sun meets Jin for the very first time.


LOCKE: I'm not lost anymore.
SUN: How did you do that?
LOCKE: Same way anything lost gets found -- I stopped looking.

Episode 6 - "Abandoned"

This is a great episode, and is extremely underrated. Shannon sees Walt for the second time (the first time was in "Man of Science, Man of Faith") but Sayid doesn't believe her. On the other side of the Island, Eko, Jin and Michael return to the Tailies. The survivors trek towards the middle section survivors' beach camp. Flashbacks show us how Shannon had to struggle when he father Adam was killed. Shannon's stepmother Sabrina abandoned her when she took the money left by Adam, and left none for Shannon. Ana Lucia sheds more light on the "Other" issue when she explains to Michael what happened on the first night of the crash (these events are later seen in "The Other 48 Days"). While the Tailies trek closer towards the beach camp, Cindy ominously disappears. They know that it was the Others that took her, and they keep moving on together. The group hears whispers (the sign that the Others are near) and start to run. At this same instant, Shannon and Sayid see Walt in the jungle. Shannon runs after him, and is shot by Ana Lucia. Sayid comes into the scene, and holds Shannon in his arms as she slowly dies. Ana Lucia looks on in disbelief, astounding at what she had just done: murdered a fellow survivor.

ANA LUCIA: They came the first night that we got here. They took 3 of us. Nothing happened for 2 weeks, then they came back. They took 9 more. They're smart, and they're animals, and they could be anywhere at any time. Now we're moving through the jungle -- their jungle -- just so you can save your little hick friend over here. And if you think that 1 gun and 1 bullet is going to stop them -- think again. So shut your mouth and keep moving.

Episode 7 - "The Other 48 Days"

This is a very unique and amazing episode. It is the first episode of LOST to have a narrative comprised of completely new characters (until the very last montage, which includes Sawyer, Jin, and Michael). This episode finally gives us the full story of what happened to the tail section survivors during the other 48 days on the Island. After the crash, Ana Lucia Cortez takes on a leadership role. The first night on the Island, the Others attack; they take a few survivors and attempt to take Eko. He kills them, and this act of murder plagues Eko because he vowed to never murder again. The Tailies begin to become suspicious of each other, and Ana Lucia takes things to the extreme when she suspects Nathan of infiltrating the camp. Goodwin, who is the real infiltrator, knows that eventually she may suspect him, so he kills Nathan. Later, Ana confronts Goodwin, saying that she knew he was never in the water after the crash, and was never on the plane. Goodwin attacks her, but Ana overcomes him and kills him. Eko, Ana, Bernard, Cindy, and Libby are the only Tailies that remain, as the rest have been captured or killed. I really enjoyed this episode, and it is really great to see this narrative of the Tailies play out. The Tailies have such a dynamic influence in Season 2, and this episode is a fabulous way to fully introduce them to us.

ANA LUCIA: You've been waiting 40 days to talk?
EKO: You waited 40 days to cry.

Episode 8 - "Collision"

The first Ana Lucia centric of the season also happens to be one of my least favorite episodes of the season. After Ana shoots Shannon in the jungle, there is a scuffle between Sayid and Eko. Ana ties up Sayid, and goes commando and attempts to take absolute control over the situation. Flashbacks show us that Ana Lucia was a cop (which partly explains her controlling demeanor she has on the island). For a majority of the episode, Ana Lucia is holding Sayid captive at gunpoint. When Eko tells Jack that it is Ana Lucia who is holding Sayid captive, Jack remembers that this is the same person he met in the airport before takeoff. When Ana is talking to Sayid, she says that she is already dead, and that she deserves to die. When she lets Sayid go, he doesn't kill Ana, but says it would be no good to kill her, since they are both already dead.

SAYID: Almost 40 days ago on this very island I tied a man to a tree and tortured him. I tortured him as I've tortured many men -- men whose voices I still hear in the night. Should you kill me? Maybe you should. Maybe you were meant to.

Episode 9 - "What Kate Did"

This is a great Kate-centric episode, and reveals what it was that Kate did to make her a fugitive. Flashbacks show us that Kate blew up her own father, Wayne, because of the way he treated Diane. At the time, Kate believed that Wayne was her stepfather, but she discovers that Wayne is really her father, and Sam Austen (who she thought was her real father) is not related to her. On the Island, while Sawyer is still recovering from his wound, Kate stays to watch over him. When Sawyer yells "why did you kill me?" at Kate, she leaves the Hatch. Jack and Locke return, pushing the button just in time. Later on, in the Hatch, Locke shows Michael and Eko the Swan Orientation film. Michael notices that there are splices in the film, and Eko abruptly leaves with nothing to say. The Jack-Kate-Sawyer love triangle enters a new degree of complication and complexity in this episode, when Kate kisses Jack in the jungle. She then runs off, with a surprised look on her face. In the Swan, Eko approaches Locke, and tells him a story from the very beginning - he explains that he found a station on the other side of the Island, and presents to John a fragment from the Swan film. Astounded by this, Locke marvels at the amazing coincidence behind this as he is putting the splice back into the film. Eko tells Locke the very iconic LOST quote: don't mistake coincidence for fate. I thoroughly enjoy watching this episode, and is one of the best Kate centrics in LOST. The ending of this episode sets things in motion for the rest of the season; Michael communicates with Walt on the Swan computer. My first thought was that the Others were acting as Walt and sending Michael messages to lure him in, but the producers have confirmed that it is indeed Walt that talked to him. It's interesting to see the timeline from "Expose," when Juliet and Ben are viewing Jack from the Pearl. This happened during the events of "What Kate Did," so it would have made sense if it were the Others trying to contact Michael.

EKO: Hello. I have something I think you should see. If you don't mind, I will begin at the beginning. Long before Christ the king of Judah was a man named Josiah.
LOCKE: Boy when you say beginning, you mean -- beginning.
EKO: At that time the temple where the people worshiped was in ruin. And so the people worshiped idols, false gods. And so the kingdom was in disarray. Josiah, since he was a good king, sent his secretary to the treasury and said: "We must rebuild the temple. Give all of the gold to the workers so that this will be done." But when the secretary returned, he had no gold. And when Josiah asked why this was, the secretary replied, "We found a book." Do you know this story?
LOCKE: No, I'm afraid I don't.
EKO: What the secretary had found was an ancient book -- the Book of Law. You may know it as the Old Testament. And it was with that ancient book, not with the gold, that Josiah rebuilt the temple. On the other side of the island we found a place much like this, and in this place we found a book. I believe what's inside there will be of great value to you.

Episode 10 - "The 23rd Psalm"

Eko is arguably LOST's most intriguing and enigmatic character, and this episode exemplifies the incredible mystery that surrounds his character. Flashbacks reveal that Eko grew up and was raised in Nigeria. When a militia came to Eko's village, they forced Eko's younger brother Yemi to shoot an old man. Yemi hesitates, and rather than let the militia kill his brother, Eko takes the gun and shoots the innocent man. This bravery impresses the militia, and they take Eko with them. On the Island, Eko discovers that Charlie is in possession of a Virgin Mary statue (the same statues that are seen in flashbacks, and were used to smuggle drugs outside of the country). Charlie and Eko go into thr jungle, towards the drug smugglers' Beechcraft. The Monster appears, and encounters Eko face-to-face. For the first time, we get a very long and full view of the mysterious Monster (that has been heard in the jungle since "Pilot, Part 1"). What is very interesting to me is that the Monster leaves Eko unharmed here. However, this is not the only encounter Eko will have with the Monster. In "The Cost of Living," Eko will encounter the Monster again, but this time, he will be killed. As seen in "Dead Is Dead," the Monster (also known as Cerberus by the DHARMA Initiative) judges people, and can take the form of other people (including Yemi from 305, and Alex from 512). I think that we're going to have to wait until Season 6 before we get the full story of the Monster.

EKO: Yemi, I understand that you live in a world where righteousness and evil seem very far apart, but that is not the real world. I am your brother and I would never do anything to hurt you, but my friends -- if you do not do what I ask -- they will burn this church to the ground. Is that worth less than the price of your name on a piece of paper? Think of the lives you will save.
YEMI: My signature does not make you a priest, Eko. You could never be a priest.

Episode 11 - "The Hunting Party"

While in the Hatch, Michael knocks Locke out, and gets ahold of guns from the armory. Michael then locks Jack inside the armory with him. Later on, in "Three Minutes," we get to see more of this scene. Michael communicates with Walt again on the Swan computer. Walt says "when they take me out. there's huge rocks with a big HOLE in the middle by the beach. you'll know when you see." Michael then heads north, towards the Others. Jack, Sawyer, and Locke form a hunting party and head out after Michael. Jack excludes Kate, saying that she needs to stay behind and push the button. In flashbacks, we see the downfall of Jack and Sarah's marriage. Jack meets a woman named Gabriella, and she wants him to perform surgery on her dying father Angelo. Christian and Jack both know there is little hope, but Angelo says that he didn't come all this way for Christian, he came for Jack. Jack ends up kissing Gabriella, and later admits this to Sarah. Sarah admits that she has been seeing someone else, and then leaves. On the Island, the hunting party continues to look for Michael. At night, Jack argues with Locke about searching for Michael, and then Tom abruptly appears. He explains that this is their Island, and the only reason the survivors are living is because they let them live. I find this scene very interesting, because it's the first time a large group of Others has talked to the survivors on the Island. This episode correlates very nicely with "Three Minutes," and each episode fills in pieces to the puzzle. "Three Minutes" shows us the story from Michael and the Others' perspective, while this episode focuses on the survivors' perspective.

TOM: Oooo, 50 days. That's what -- almost 2 whole months, huh? Tell me, you go over a man's house for the first time, do you take off your shoes? Do you put your feet up on his coffee table? Do you walk in the kitchen, eat food that doesn't belong to you? [He looks at Locke.] Open the door to rooms you got no business opening? You know, somebody a whole lot smarter than anybody here once said: "Since the dawn of our species man's been blessed with curiosity." You know the other one about curiosity don't you, Jack? This is not your island. This is our island. And the only reason you're living on it is because we let you live on it.

Episode 12 - "Fire + Water"

Ever since season one, Charlie has been struggling with his heroin addiction. After "The Moth," he burned his heroin stash in the fire. Not long after, in "Exodus," Charlie discovers an entire stash of heroin in the drug smugglers' plane. In this episode we see a lot of dreams and visions from Charlie that contain a variety of imagery, foreshadowing, and symbolism. Locke has a feeling that Charlie is using again, and when he follows Charlie to his stash, he takes it, saying that he hgave Charlie a choice before, but not anymore. After Charlie awakes from one of his dreams, he is holding Aaron precariously near the ocean. Claire and the survivors find him, and Charlie is baffled as to what happened. One of my favorite moments in this episode is when Sawyer tells Hurley to make his move on Libby, calling him three hilarious nicknames in the process (Jabba, Jethro, and Hoss). The climax of the episode comes when Charlie sets a fire near the camp, causing all of the survivors to go to help put it out. Charlie uses this diversion to kidnap Aaron, and take him to the ocean to try and baptize him. After he reluctantly returns Aaron, Locke punches him three times, and the survivors leave him helpless on the shore.

EKO: Something wrong, Charlie?
CHARLIE: Apart from me losing my mind? No, everything's just peachy.
EKO: Why would you say you are losing your mind?
CHARLIE: How about the fact that I've been sleepwalking? Stealing babies from their cribs? Oh yeah, and then there's the vivid dreams that make me feel like I'm completely awake until, of course, I wake up.
EKO: What are your dreams about?
CHARLIE: Variations on Aaron being in mortal peril -- trapped in a piano, drifting out to sea, there's the flying dove, and Claire and my mum dressed as angels telling me I need to save the baby. [Eko is silent] What?
EKO: Have you ever considered that these dreams mean something?
CHARLIE: Like what?
EKO: What if you do need to save the baby?

Episode 13 - "The Long Con"

We have always known that Sawyer is a con man, but we don't see the full extent of his cons until this episode. We know that Ben Linus is always the man with the plan, but Sawyer can also construct ingenious cons. In flashbacks, Sawyer teaches his girlfriend Cassidy about cons. Eventually, she tells him that her husband has a lot of money, and that there may be a way to get it. Since the crash, Jack and Locke have been the primary leaders of the survivors; they have made many important decisions regarding the Hatch, guns, food supply, etc. Sawyer is fed up with this, so he enlists Charlie to help him perform a long con on the survivors. The benefit for Sawyer is that he will attain all of the guns, and the benefit for Charlie is that he will get to embarrass Locke. The first part of the con is when Charlie goes into the garden and attempts to kidnap Sun. He leaves Sun injured in the jungle, and the survivors immediately suspect it was the Others. Sawyer then talks to Kate, saying how did Sun break free with her hands bound and while unconscious? And why are there tracks when the Others don't leave any? They find a hood hanging from a branch, but Sawyer points out that it's a different hood than the one used on Kate. Sawyer says "it's all in the details, and they're wrong." Because of this, Kate suspects Ana Lucia was behind it. Sawyer approaches Locke, warning him about the survivors coming for the guns. Locke goes out to hide the guns, but is followed by Charlie. Sawyer attains the guns, and becomes the new "sheriff" of the survivors. I think that this is a very clever episode, and a fabulous Sawyer-centric. I love seeing how Sawyer used to con in the past, and it was awesome to see him do a long con on the Island. At this point in the season, Locke and Jack become quite annoying (Jack is constantly trying to be in control, and Locke feels possiveness over the guns) so it was great to see Sawyer take charge.


SAWYER: That's right, Jack. He's as stupid as you are. You were so busy worrying about each other you never even saw me coming, did you? How about you listen up because I'm only going to say this once. You took my stuff. While I was off trying to get us help -- get us rescued -- you found my stash and you took it, divvied it up -- my shaving cream, my batteries, even my beer. And then something else happened, you decided these two boys here were going to tell you what to do and when to do it. Well, I'm done taking orders. And I don't want my stuff back. The shaving cream don't matter. Batteries don't matter. The only thing that matters now are guns. And if you want one you're going to have to come to me to get it. [He looks at Sayid.] Oh, you want to torture me, don't you? Show everybody how civilized you are. Go ahead, but I'll die before I give them back. And then you'll really be screwed, won't you? New sheriff in town, boys! You all best get used to it.

Episode 14 - "One of Them"

In this episode, Rousseau finds Sayid, and tells him that she captured one of the Others. It still confuses me, because Rousseau had actually seen and met this Other 16 years earlier. Benjamin Linus was the one who kidnapped Alex from Danielle. However, Danielle doesn't tell this to Sayid, but she insists that she knows he is one of them. Perhaps Danielle forgot about Ben? But really, how could you forget about the person who kidnapped your daughter? I don't know. Anyway, Ben Linus claims to be "Henry Gale" from Minnesota, and says he crashed on the Island in a balloon. This is the first lie that we hear Ben say on the show (and we all know that Benjamin Linus is a liar). Benry attempts to escape, but is shot down by Rousseau. Back at the Hatch, Jack treats Ben's wounds, but Locke and Sayid are very wary of their new visitor. One of LOST's recurring themes is Sayid's unrelenting skepticism. When Sayid has a hunch, it's pretty much right 100% of the time. He thought that Henry was one of them, and he was. He thought that Mikhail was one of them, and he was. He thought that Michael had been compromised by the Others, and he was. Do you get what I'm saying? Sayid resorts back to his ways when he was a torturer, and beats Ben bloody. Flashbacks show the full extent of Sayid's torturing career. Back in the Hatch, Jack prevents Locke from pushing the button, and for the first time we see the countdown timer go beyond zero. Red hieroglyphs flip up, but before we see a system failure, Locke enters the numbers and saves the world. I really like this episode, and it's the first episode where we see Benjamin Linus (and little did we know at the time that Ben was the leader of the Others, and would become one of the most prominent characters in Lost).


SAYID: He is one of them.
JACK: Yeah? Did he tell you that?
JACK: Then how do you know?
SAYID: Because I know. He is one of them.
JACK: I think that Rousseau thought that about you once, Sayid. If I'm not mistaken she strapped you down, she shocked you, all because she thought you were one of them.

Episode 15 - "Maternity Leave"

This episode ranks as one of the best of this season. Claire fears that Aaron is sick, and her fears worsen when Rousseau arrives at camp, claiming that he is infected with the sickness (the same sickness we see in "This Place Is Death," when Danielle kills her science team). With the help of Libby, Claire is able to remember part of when she was abducted by Ethan. She enlists Kate to go and help her find this place. Eventually, with the help of Danielle, they find the Staff station. This is the third DHARMA station to be revealed in the show. On-island flashbacks show us what happened after Ethan kidnapped Claire. Here is something that is interesting to me: Tom talks to Ethan, and refers to Jacob as "Him". It has been confirmed by Darlton that "Him" is Jacob. So why would Tom be afraid of what "He" would do? Most of the Others, including Tom, have never even seen Jacob. With the help of Alex and Danielle Rousseau, Claire escapes from the Staff and the Others. Claire finally remembers why she scratched Danielle; it was because she was trying to save her life. This is an incredible episode, and gives us the long-awaited story of what happened to Claire when she was gone for two weeks.

BEN: Why would I lie? They think I'm one of these others -- other what?
EKO: Please, stop talking, Henry. The first night I spent on this island I was dragged into the jungle by 2 men. They never spoke a word to me, nor I to them. I killed these men -- smashed in their head with a stone, felt their blood on my arms. I need you to know how sorry I am for this. I need you to know that I am back on the righteous path now. And that I regret my actions. I ask you for your forgiveness.
BEN: Why are you telling me this?
EKO: Because I needed to tell someone.

Episode 16 - "The Whole Truth"

This is one of the most underrated episodes ever, and ranks in the top five episodes of Season 2 for me. It is also the best Sun-centric episode of the series so far. In flashbacks, we see that Sun and Jin are having fertility problems, and the doctor says that it is because of Sun. This infuriates Jin, who suspects that Sun knew about this. Later on, the doctor approaches Sun and explains that it is really Jin who is infertile, and that he was afraid to tell the truth because of his position in Paik Industries. On the Island, Locke enlists Ana Lucia to talk to Benry about his balloon. Ana convinces him to draw a map to the balloon, and she leaves with Sayid and Charlie to look for it. She does this without talking to Jack or Locke, since they are too worried about Locke and Jack. On the Island, Sun takes a pregnancy test and discovers that she is pregnant. She is unsure of whether or not the baby is Jin's (and we won't find out until late season three episode "D.O.C."). Sun tells Jin the whole truth about his infertility, and Jin believes that it's a miracle. Th ending of this episode is one of the greatest endings of any Lost episode ever; Ben says that if he were one of them, he would make his map lead the survivors into an ambush, and force a trade, him for them. He then says, "got any milk?"

BEN: Wow, you guys have some real trust issues, don't you? Guess it makes sense she didn't tell you. I mean, with the two of you fighting all the time. Of course, if I was one of them -- these people that you seem to think are your enemies -- what would I do? Well, there'd be no balloon, so I'd draw a map to a real secluded place like a cave or some underbrush -- good place for a trap -- an ambush. And when your friends got there a bunch of my people would be waiting for them. Then they'd use them to trade for me. I guess it's a good thing I'm not one of them, huh? You guys got any milk?

Episode 17 - Lockdown

There are many surprising twists and amazing scenes in this episode. It is also a Locke-centric, which are typically full of mythology, mystery, and intrigue. Anthony Cooper comes to Locke again in flashbacks, and this time he wants help. Locke feels reluctant at first to help the man who conned him and stole his kidney, but eventually he agrees. When Helen finds out that he returned to help his father, she leaves him, saying that Locke chose him over her. This devastates Locke, who was planning on marrying her. I have a lot of sympathy for Locke, but I really don't understand why he helped Anthony. He could've returned the money to the rightful owners, or kept it for himself, but why give it to the con man who ruined your life? I know Locke did it because he wanted to improve upon their relationship, but I don't think their relationship could ever be improved. On the Island, Sayid, Ana, and Charlie find Gale's balloon. At first this leads us to believe that Ben was telling the truth, but Sayid's unrelenting skepticism comes back, and he digs up the grave, discovering a black man by the name of Henry Gale.


BEN: Then I'm going to need your word, John. I'm going to need your word that you won't let your people do anything to me.
LOCKE: Well, if you're who you say you are then what are you worried about?
BEN: Things have happened to them -- things that I have nothing to do with. But they've got no one to blame except for me. So I'm going to need your word that you'll protect me, no matter what.
LOCKE: Who are you?
BEN: My name is Henry Gale. I'm from Minnesota. And I crashed on this island just like you.
LOCKE: Alright, you have my word.

Episode 18 - "Dave"

Since Season 1 I had wondered about why Hurley never lost weight - this episode answers that question. He has a secret stash! Unlike Sawyer's stash (which includes medicine, guns, magazines, etc.) Hurley has a stash of food that he's been hiding from the camp. With the help of Libby, Hurley decides to destroy his stash and begin a new life on the island. Just after he does this though, they discover the food pallet that has fallen from the sky. Along with Hurley's temptation for food comes someone named Dave. Dave is Hurley's subconscious, and flashbacks show us that he prompted Hurley to eat when he was in Santa Rosa's. We're led to believe that Dave isn't imaginary for most of the episode, but when Dr. Brooks reveals a photo of Hurley's arm around thin air, he begins to realize that he's making Dave up. In the Hatch, Sayid interrogates Ben, who is now under captivity as an Other. Ben is once again caught in a lie when Sayid asks about Henry Gale; Ben says that Henry was dead in the balloon when he found him, but Sayid pulls out a 20 dollar bill with writing from Henry. Sayid threatens to kill Ben if he doesn't talk to him about the Others, but Ben says that He would kill him if he did. Hurley follows Dave to a cliff. Dave tries to convince Hurley that everything he sees is all made up and imaginary; he says that's why Hurley's lottery numbers are the same numbers in the Hatch, and he says that no girl like Libby would ever like Hurley. Hurley almost listens to Dave, but Libby comes and convinces him that everything they see is real.


CHARLIE: Locke said some kind of blast doors trapped him in the Hatch. Maybe it was because of this -- so no one would see who dropped it. Any of you guys see a plane last night?
SAWYER: Yeah, I saw it, Tattoo. I just decided not to tell.
SAWYER: Hold on, take it easy. You guys are like locusts. How about a little order here?
CHARLIE: Shouldn't we let someone a little more trustworthy take care of this?
SAWYER: Like you, babynapper?

Episode 19 - "S.O.S."

Rose and Bernard are two of my favorite characters of LOST. Ever since season one, these characters are usually on the sidelines, and rarely are involved in the main plot or storyline. I love seeing there backstory revealed in this episode. Flashbacks show us that Rose had cancer, and Bernard brought her to Australia to see Isaac of Uluru, a faith healer. Rose doesn't expect him to fix her, and she tells Bernard that she has been healed so that he'll stop trying to do something. On the Island, Bernard gathers the survivors in an attempt to make an SOS sign across the beach. Rose is opposed to the idea, much to Bernard's surprise. Rose thinks that if she leaves, her cancer would return. I think that this is a very underrated episode, and is a very emotional on-island and off-island story that deepens our understanding of Rose and Bernard's relationship.


BERNARD: Okay, 2 months we've been on this island -- 2 months. And already we have a water trough, and we've got a food pantry. And people are taking showers in your hatch. Have you forgotten that we all crashed on this island? It's like none of you want to go home again.
CLAIRE: How can you say that? Of course we want to go home.
BERNARD: Well, then why aren't we doing anything about it?
HURLEY: Dude, we, like, built a raft. But it got blown up.
BERNARD: Okay, so what are we doing now? That pallet of food had a parachute which means a plane dropped it here which means there are other planes that fly over the island. So, we are going to build a sign -- a massive sign along the beach. So that way if a plane flies over or a satellite takes pictures from up there -- we want to make damn sure that they know we're here -- that they know about us.
ROSE: Maybe we should speak to Jack about this first.
BERNARD: Well, do we have to run everything by Jack? I mean, he's not the president. He's a doctor.
ROSE: You're a dentist.

Episode 20 - "Two for the Road"

After being with the Others for several episodes, Michael Dawson has finally returned. We are led to believe that Michael found one of them, followed him to the Others' camp, and then returned to the beach. Little do we know that Michael is really working for the Others now. Ben has been plotting to use Michael in order to capture Jack, Kate, and Sawyer for his master plan. His plan, of course, is to manipulate and exploit Jack's emotions so that he will agree to do the spinal surgery on Ben. Flashbacks in this episode show us the relationship between Ana Lucia and Christian Shephard. Ana agrees to be Christian's bodyguard in Australia. Christian goes to see Lindsey, and wants to see his daughter, Claire Littleton. The most shocking part of this episode is the ending. This is truly the most shocking and unbelieable moments in all of LOST history. Michael shoots Ana Lucia and Libby, and then enters the armory, and shoots himself in the arm. It is now when we finally realize that Michael has been working for the Others, and "Henry Gale" now escapes.


LOCKE: So, it worked?
JACK: What are you talking about, John?
LOCKE: Your deal -- the trade. If they gave us Michael...
JACK: They didn't give us anything.
LOCKE: So, it was just a coincidence that he came wandering out?
JACK: I was shouting; he heard my voice. What, they just let Michael go hoping we would keep up our end of the bargain? You think they're on the honor system?

Episode 21 - "?"

Eko is my favorite character in all of LOST, and this is one of my favorites of all-time. This episode really explores the mythology on a deeper level, and further develops the amazing relationship between Eko and Locke. Eko and Locke's relationship is so dynamic and enigmatic, and it was too short-lived. Both of these characters have a lot of faith, and they are very similar and different in many ways. After having a dream, Eko and Locke head off to find the ?. Locke remembers seeing the ? on the blast door map, but he is losing faith in the Hatch and the Island. Eko is convinced, though, that it is important that he and Locke find this place. Eko and Locke find the drug smugglers' plane, which happened to land right on top of the ? (Pearl station). I find it very interesting that the drug plane and the Pearl station are both in one location; both of these locations are fundamental aspects of Eko's faith in the Island. Inside of the Pearl, the dynamic duo views the Pearl Orientation video, hosted by Mark Wickmund. This video strengthens Eko's faith in the Hatch, saying that their work is now more important than ever. Locke, however, feels like the Hatch was a colossal joke, and that they're slaves if they continue to push the button. These two different faiths in the Hatch becomes a very important theme for the finale.

LOCKE: What are you doing?
EKO: I'm taking this back with us.
EKO: Because they may be important.
LOCKE: Important? I'm sorry, weren't you just watching the same thing I was?
EKO: Yes, John. And I believe the work you have been doing is more important now than ever.
LOCKE: What work?
EKO: Pushing the button.
LOCKE: That's not work. That's a joke -- rats in a maze with no cheese.
EKO: It is work, John. We are being tested.
LOCKE: Tested?
EKO: The reason to do it -- push the button -- is not because we are told to do so in a film.
LOCKE: Oh -- well, then what is the reason, Mr. Eko?
EKO: We do it because we believe we are meant to. Isn't that the reason you pushed it, John?
LOCKE: I was never meant to do anything. Every single second of my pathetic little life is as useless as that button! You think it's important? You think it's necessary? It's nothing. It's nothing. It's meaningless. And who are you to tell me that it's not?

Episode 22 - "Three Minutes"

Michael Dawson has a very intricate and unique storyline in LOST. Every since "Exodus," when Walt was taken off the raft, Michael has become intent on finding him. In "The Hunting Party," Michael goes off searching for Walt, but is captured by the Others. The Others make a deal with Michael: he must free "Henry Gale" in order to get his son back. Michael goes to the extreme, murdering two fellow survivors in the process. In this episode, we see the on-island flashbacks that detail Michael's time with the Others. We see parallel events from "The Hunting Party," when Jack, Sawyer, and Locke went searching for Michael. At the Others camp, Michael sees another hatch, and the Others' lifestyle. They live in tents and yurts, eat fish, and have few guns. This is all a facade, though, and when Walt visits Michael, he says that they're pretending. Overall, I really enjoy watching this episode, and feel that it's very underrated.


SAWYER: Got some good news for you. Captain Arab's in too. Calvary rides at sunrise.
MICHAEL: You told Sayid?
SAWYER: Yeah, I told Sayid.
MICHAEL: You shouldn't have done that!
SAWYER: Oh, well I'm sorry. I just figure if we going to war, we'd want the one guy who's actually been in a war. That a problem?
MICHAEL: No, it's not a problem.

Episode 23 - "Live Together, Die Alone, Part 1"

Part one of the explosive season two finale starts off with the return of Desmond David Hume on his boat, the Elizabeth. In flashbacks, we discover that the Elizabeth was named after Elizabath "Libby" Smith, one of the Flight 815 survivors. I always wonder what it would have been like if Libby had survived; seeing Desmond and her boat that she gave him would've been quite the shock to her. Michael leads Jack, Kate, Sawyer, and Hugo (the four people on the list he received) towards the Others' camp. During their trek, the Hurley Bird returns. Michael attempts to shoot it, and realizes that his gun was never loaded. He is now suspicious, fearing that his cover has been blown. In the Hatch, Locke and Desmond force a lockdown, keeping Eko outside. Locke is convinced that the button is fake, claiming he has never been more sure about anything in his life. As Sayid, Jin, and Sun are sailing toward's the Others' village, they see the four-toed statue. Little do we know that this statue is an essential part of LOST's mythology, and is the home of Jacob, the leader of the Others. In a flashback, we see that Desmond was dishonorably discharged from the Royal Scots Regiment. He sees Charles Widmore, who pays him money so that he will leave Penelope. The on-island flashbacks in this episode are very interesting, and show us more of Desmond's time on the Island with Kelvin. One day, Desmond finds Kelvin in the Swan basement, holding the key above the fail-safe. Kelvin says that the Incident was a magnetic leak, and the button has to be pushed to discharge the buildup. He says that with a simple turn of the key, all of this goes away.

LOCKE: That in a minute that computer's going to start beeping, and when it does you're going to let it go. You're going to let it run down to zero, past zero. And you're not going to push the button.
EKO: But I am going to push the button. Why wouldn't I?
LOCKE: Because you don't want to be a slave.
EKO: I am a slave to nothing.
LOCKE: You're a slave to that, just like I was. So I'm going to tell you again—don't push it.
EKO: Do not tell me what I can do.
LOCKE: You cannot push that button. No, it's not real. We're only puppets—puppets on strings. As long as we push it, we'll never be free!
EKO: Well, you're free now, John. Do not come back.

Episode 24 - "Live Together, Die Alone, Part 2"

The season two finale is an incredible episode, and is full of intriguing flashbacks, shocking reveals, incredible acting, and an unforgettable cliffhanger. Sayid comes ashore to the Island, and enters the Others' camp. He finds that no one is there, and that the Hatch opens up into the cliff. On the other side of the Island, Jack forces Michael to admit to his crime to Kate, Sawyer, and Hugo. Michael admits that it was the only way, and that he murdered Ana Lucia and Libby. Jack says that they have to keep moving, or the Others will kill them all. Flashbacks show us that Desmond follows Kelvin outside, discovering that he has been pretending to use his HAZMAT suit to deceive Desmond. This makes me wonder, why would DHARMA provide the Hatch inhabitants with the HAZMAT suits? Was the quarantine designed to keep them in the Hatch? Or was there really a sickness on the Island? Desmond discovers that Kelvin planned on leaving Desmond, and taking the Elizabeth back home. Desmond unintentionally kills Kelvin, and runs back to the Hatch to enter the Numbers. He is late, though, and a system failure is under affect. This causes the crash of Oceanic Flight 815 on Semptember 22nd, 2004. We see this day, Semptember 22nd, from numerous points of view. In "Pilot, Part 1," "The Other 48 Days," and other episodes, we see the 72 survivors of Flight 815 crash on the Island. In "A Tale of Two Cities," we see the Others witness the crash from the Barracks, and Ben commanding Ethan and Goodwin to infiltrate the camps. And in "Live Together, Die Alone," we see Desmond Hume fail to enter the Numbers, causing the electromagnetic failure and resulting in the crash of Flight 815. At first you might suspect that this is all coincidence, but it is much more than that. In "The Incident," we see Jacob touch several of the survivors of Flight 815. Did this touch really alter their destinies? Or does free will still exist? Hopefully, many of these questions will be answered next season. At the end of this episode, we see "Henry" arrive at Pala Ferry as the leader of the Others; Michael leaves the Island, with Walt; Jack, Kate, and Sawyer are prisoners of the Others. In the final scene, we see Henrik and Matthias inside of a listening station. They see that an eletromagnetic analomy has occured, and they contact Penelope Widmore: "I think we found it."

DESMOND: We need to push the button.
LOCKE: No, we don't!
DESMOND: Do you not hear me, brother? I crashed your bloody plane?
LOCKE: How did you manage to do that?
DESMOND: On that day, those numbers turned to hieroglyphics. And when the last one came down this whole started to shake. And that screen? That screen filled up with System Failure. And I know what they are. 9/22/04—September the 22nd, 2004, the day your planed crashed. It's real! It's all bloody real! Now, push the damn button!
LOCKE: I know what I saw! It's a lie; it's not real! None of it is real!
DESMOND: You don't want to push the button? Then I will.
DESMOND: You killed us. You killed us all.
LOCKE: No. I just saved us all.

I hope you enjoyed my review of LOST Season 2. This has really been a fantastic season. I'd love to here your thoughts, comments, and analysis on Season 2!
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